Lassie Goes to Washington . . . and to Work: Use of Service Animals as Reasonable Accommodations in Employment

by: Victor N. Corpuz and Justin H. Smith

SUMMER 2017 | AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

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Following the first use of trained “seeing eye” dogs to assist World War I veterans in the 1920s, many laws were enacted to protect the visually-impaired from discrimination based on the use of seeing eye dogs. The American with Disabilities Act (ADA), which was enacted in 1990, includes protections from discrimination based on the use of assistance animals.  Americans use an increasing variety of animals to assist with many types of  disabilities. This article discusses what constitutes reasonable accommodations required under the ADA with respect to the use of service animals by disabled individuals. The article considers regulations issued by the U.S. Department of Justice in 2010 and several judicial opinions about use of service animals as a reasonable accommodation.

 

This article can be cited as:

Victor N. Corpuz & Justin H. Smith, Lassie Goes to Washington . . . and to Work: Use of Service Animals as Reasonable Accommodations in Employment, UNT DALL. L. REV. ON THE CUSP, Summer 2017, at 7, [insert cited pg. no.].

 

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